Emotional wellbeing

Werneth School is committed to providing care, support and guidance, and counselling on all issues related to Health and Well-Being.

On the page below we have details of the agencies that work with Werneth.

 

Mrs Houghton has worked at Werneth school for several years as a Year Inclusion Manager. She has a diploma in person centred counselling and recently, has taken on the new role of Emotional Health and Wellbeing Coordinator, working with students on different levels of emotional and social needs. School can offer one to one support, group work and drop-in sessions.


Children and young people may experience a wide range of emotional difficulties which can manifest themselves in many different ways such as anxiety, depression, self-harming, eating disorders and panic attacks.

Mrs Houghton works along side Mrs Miller and Mrs Craven they are located in the HART department. If any student wishes to speak to them there is referral form that needs to be completed by their Year Inclusion Manager. However, if a student is in crisis they can access someone to talk to the very same day.

 

 

 

Gender Identity Support Links for school website:

Mermaids UK

The proud Trust

Stone Wall

Where's your head at - student guide

Our Kids are alright - parent guide

 

BEACON COUNSELLING


Beacon Counselling is here at Werneth High to help you if you feel that life is getting on top of you or that your emotions are confusing you to the point where you can’t sort them out alone or with your friends and family.  Counselling offers a private space in which you can explore your situation and your feelings about this, supported by a counsellor who will respect your views and help you to make sense of your emotions. 

Counselling is confidential – which means that as long as you aren’t at risk of being seriously hurt by another person, or of seriously hurting yourself, Yvonne will keep what you say private.  If she does feel you are at risk, she will always try to talk to you before she talks to anyone else.

Yvonne won’t tell you what to do – she will help you to work out what you want to do, if anything.  Sometimes it isn’t about doing anything – just being able to talk about difficulties and have your feelings and opinions be accepted and valued is all that a person needs.

Your counsellor is Yvonne and she has lots of experience in helping young people deal with a wide range of difficulties.  Some of these are:

  • problems in relationships with family, friends or others
  • feeling anxious or ‘not good enough’
  • being angry a lot of the time or struggling to control your temper
  • feeling low or unhappy
  • losing someone you love
  • finding ways to speak out about and survive abuse
  • wanting to hurt yourself

 

Mrs Shelmerdine
Young Person’s Service Coordinator Beacon Counselling

If you think counselling is for you, you can ask to see Yvonne.  Talk to your Year Inclusion Manager, Ms Dee or Mrs Haughton they will refer you.  You might also want to check out our Self-Help information below.

If you think counselling is for you, you can ask to see Yvonne.  Talk to your Year Inclusion Manager, Ms Dee or Mrs Haughton they will refer you.  You might also want to check out our Self-Help information below.

 

Self Help Publications...

Anxiety

Bereavement

Self Harm

 

Mrs Shelmerdine is in school all day on Tuesdays. (Students need to see your Year Inclusion Manager to book an appointment.)

 

You can find more information on the Beacon website

Beacon Website

 

 

SCHOOL NURSE

Werneth School is committed to providing care, support and guidance, and counselling on all issues related to Health and Well-Being.

 

Young Carers

Werneth School is committed to enabling Young Carers to access education and support. Our policy and approach aim to ensure Young Carers at this school are identified and offered appropriate support to access the education and other services to which they are entitled.


Young Carers are children and young people who provide care to another family member. The level of care they provide would usually be undertaken by an adult and as a result of this they take on a level of responsibility that is inappropriate to their age and development. This is likely to have a significant impact on their childhood experiences.

Here at Werneth we have nominated a School Governor (Mr McAllister), a School Lead (Miss Dee) and three HART staff members (Mrs Craven, Mrs Miller and Mr Mcallister) who provide specific day to day support to Young Carers from the point your child joins our school, and throughout their time with us.

The HART team focus on providing students with mental health and wellbeing issues appropriate support as well as a place to meet up before school, during breaks/lunch and for after school homework clubs.

If there are any specific issues you would like to speak to someone in school about, you should initially contact:

Miss Dee
Student Services
Tel: 0161 494 1222 (Ext 1048)


If you would like to speak to one of the HART team directly please:
Tel: 0161 494 1222 (Ext 1060)

 

 

Summary of the Werneth School Young Carers Policy

Werneth School is committed to enabling Young Carers to access education and support. This policy aims to ensure Young Carers at this school are identified and offered appropriate support to access the education and other services to which they are entitled.
Definition:
Young Carers are children and young people who provide care to another family member. The level of care they provide would usually be undertaken by an adult and as a result of this they take on a level of responsibility that is inappropriate to their age and development. This is likely to have a significant impact on their childhood experiences.
The person they look after will have one or more of the following:

  • Physical disability
  • Sensory disability
  • Learning disability
  • Mental health problem
  • Chronic illness
  • Substance misuse problem

Caring Tasks:
A young carer will take on additional responsibilities to those appropriate to their age and development. A young carer might be providing the main care or share responsibilities with another family member. The caring tasks that a young carer has to deal with can range from:


Nursing care

 

Giving medication, injections, changing dressings, assisting with mobility etc.

Personal intimate care

Washing, dressing, feeding and helping with toilet requirements.

Emotional care

Being compliant, monitoring the emotional state of the person cared for, listening, being a shoulder to cry on, supporting a parent through depression and trying to cheer them up. In cases where a young carer is supporting an adult with drug/alcohol misuse problem, they will often take a leading role in trying to keep that person safe.

Domestic care

Doing a substantial amount of housework, cooking, shopping, cleaning, laundry etc.

Financial care

Running the household, bill paying, benefit collection etc.

Child care

Taking responsibility for younger siblings in addition to their other caring responsibilities.

Communication & Interpreting

Communicating on behalf of the adult or family with agencies/services and interpreting for a language or sensory impairment.


Possible Effect on Education

Werneth School acknowledges that there are likely to be Young Carers among its students, and that being a young carer can have an adverse effect on a young person’s access to education and attainment.

Because of their responsibilities at home, a young carer might:

  • have erratic or poor school attendance
  • arrive late at school
  • decline in academic achievement
  • not complete homework
  • not attend out of school activities or school trips
  • lack motivation
  • have back problems, aches and pains patterns of being generally unwell
  • appear withdrawn, isolated from peers, have difficulties socialising
  • show, anxiety, depression, anger, self-harming behaviour
  • have poor concentration (due to worrying about the person who is cared for)
  • have poor home/ school relationship
  • have parents who do not attend parents evening or lack of overall contact with school
  • have false signs of maturity, assuming an adult role in social situations or have difficulty enjoying childhood activities

It also might be difficult to engage their parents (due to fears about child being taken into care, fears about their condition being misunderstood or their parenting skills being called into question). School may need to make alternative arrangements for communication about attainment.


 

Support offered at Werneth School

Werneth School acknowledges that Young Carers may need extra support to ensure they have equal access to education and opportunities offered through the life of a school. Through this policy, school is giving the message that Young Carers’ education and school experience is important.

The Designated School Lead for Young Carers is Miss Dee (Assistant Headteacher) with support from the HART team (who are the day to day organisational leads for Young Carers) will liaise with colleagues, Stockport Young Carers and other relevant agencies with the consent of the young carer. All students will be made aware of these designated links.
The School Governor Lead is Mr McAllister, who will ensure that the issue of Young Carers is regularly reviewed by the schools governing body.

Werneth School will ensure that appropriate information is shared with school staff in order that there is an awareness of the young carer’s situation.
Additionally, … 

  • we appreciate that Young Carers will not discuss their family situation unless they feel comfortable. The young person’s caring role will be acknowledged and respected.
  • we will treat Young Carers in a sensitive and child-centred way, upholding confidentiality.
  • we will ensure Young Carers can access all available support services in school and other appropriate services/agencies.
  • we will follow safeguarding procedures regarding any young carer at risk of significant harm due to inappropriate levels of caring.
  • we will promote discussion and learning in all areas of the curriculum to facilitate fuller understanding, acceptance of and respect for, the issues surrounding illness, disability and caring.
  • we recognise that flexibility may be needed when responding to the needs of Young Carers. Available provision includes (but is not limited to):
    • access to a telephone during breaks and lunchtime, to phone home
    • negotiable deadlines for homework/coursework (when needed)
    • access to homework club
    • lunchtime detentions rather than after school detentions (where possible)
    • arrangements for schoolwork to be sent home (where there is a genuine crisis).
    • any approved absence for a young carer will be time limited (DfES 2006)
    • access for parents with impaired mobility
    • alternative communication options for parents who are sensory impaired or housebound
    • advice to parents if there are difficulties in transporting a young carer to school

 

Why do we need a school lead for Young Carers?

Background to the role 
A young carer is a child or young person who provides care for another family member. The level of care they provide would usually be undertaken by an adult and as a result of this they take on a level of responsibility that is inappropriate to their age and development.
The person or persons that they look after will have one or more of the following:

  • Physical disability
  • Sensory disability
  • Learning disability
  • Mental health problems
  • Chronic illness
  • Drug or alcohol misuse problems 

They may also be taking on a caring role if they are: 

  • growing up with disabled siblings,
  • in a family where there has been recent serious or terminal illness diagnosed,
  • coping with illness in wider family. 

Key findings from ‘Hidden from view’ report from the Children’s Society, 2013.


1. Latest census statistics 2013 reveal there are 166,363 Young Carers in England, compared to around 139,000 in 2001. This is likely to be an underrepresentation of the true picture as many remain under the radar of professionals.
2.One in 12 Young Carers is caring for more than 15 hours per week. Around one in 20 miss school because of their caring responsibilities.
3.Young Carers are 1.5 times more likely than their peers to be from black, Asian or minority ethnic communities, and are twice as likely to not speak English as their first language.
4.Young Carers are 1.5 times more likely than their peers to have a special educational need or a disability.
5.The average annual income for families with a young carer is £5000 less than families who do not have a young carer.
6.There is no strong evidence that Young Carers are more likely than their peers to come into contact with support agencies, despite government recognition that this needs to happen.
7.Young Carers have significantly lower educational attainment at GCSE level, the equivalent to nine grades lower overall than their peers e.g. the difference between nine B’s and nine C’s.
8.Young Carers are more likely than the national average to be not in education, employment or training (NEET) between the ages of 16 and 19.

Around 21% of Young Carers identified in Stockport miss school because of their caring responsibilities. Many will be late to school and unable to complete their homework on time. When at school Young Carers may have difficulty concentrating due to anxiety about the person they care for. In addition to academic problems, many Young Carers have difficulty integrating socially within the school environment, with some being teased or bullied by their peers.

In spite of these problems the majority of Young Carers will not be identified as such by staff in schools, partly because Young Carers and their families often remain silent about their caring responsibilities due to fears of the reactions of statutory agencies and peers and the stigma surrounding some health conditions, addictions and disabilities or they are unaware that help may be available.

Principle 4 from the Key Principles of Practice (The Children’s Society 2008) recommends that:
“Schools and colleges take responsibility to identify Young Carers at an early stage and have a named staff member with lead responsibility for Young Carers to ensure that they have the same access to a full education and career choices as their peers; and to be responsible for promoting and co-ordinating the support they need in school and liaising with other agencies as appropriate.”
Stockport CYPD Scrutiny Committee Review (February 2010) recommends that schools identify a school lead with responsibility to monitor young carer provision and support


 

Identifying a Young Carer in School

Signs which may indicate that a child is caring for someone at home may include

  • arriving late at school
  • missing days at school
  • tiredness
  • hunger
  • clothing or appearance may not be clean or tidy
  • underachievement
  • unable to complete home work on time
  • withdrawn, over sensitive, low self esteem
  • behavioural problems
  • difficulties with peer group, limited social skills
  • isolation, embarrassed to take friends home
  • not attending after school activities or activities in local area
  • non-attendance on school trips, particularly residential
  • being bullied
  • financial difficulties
  • physical problems, such as back pain from lifting
  • false signs of maturity, from assuming adult roles
  • parents may have little or no contact with school, be unable to attend parents’ evenings, review days, or social activities.

 

Signpost Young Carers Website

 

mental health and wellbeing

Werneth School is committed to providing care, support and guidance, and counselling on all issues related to Health and Well-Being.

 

If you need any support contact...

 

Ms Dee Contact - Student Services

0161 494 1222 Extension Number 1048

Email me at: joanne.dee@wernethschool.com

 

Mrs Claudia Houghton Contact - Student Services

0161 494 1222 Extension Number 1060

Email me at: claudia.houghton@wernethschool.com

Mrs Houghton has worked at Werneth school for several years as a Year Inclusion Manager. She has a diploma in person centred counselling and recently, has taken on the new role of Emotional Health and Wellbeing Coordinator, working with students on different levels of emotional and social needs. School can offer one to one support, group work and drop-in sessions.

Children and young people may experience a wide range of emotional difficulties which can manifest themselves in many different ways such as:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Self-harming
  • Eating disorders
  • Panic attacks

Mrs Houghton works along side Mrs Miller and Mrs Craven they are located in the HART department. If any student wishes to speak to them there is referral form that needs to be completed by their Year Inclusion Manager. However, if a student is in crisis they can access someone to talk to the very same day.

Mental Health and Wellbeing self-assessment - Check your mood


content provided by NHS Choices

TIME TO CHANGE

 

 

Mosaic

 

MOSAIC is a specialist drug and alcohol service.

MOSAIC provides a range of interventions to young people, families and communities to prevent and reduce substance related harm and to promote recovery.

The teams operating within MOSAIC include a specialist treatment and medical team, a dedicated family team, a school based team (MSBS), and a team specialising in sex and relationships education (SRE).

Werneth have their own dedicated Mosaic worker, her name is Sophia Greenidge and she is based in the Multi Agency Room in Student Support.

You can drop in to see her or you can call her to book an appointment on 0161 218 1114.

You can find more information on the Mosaic website...

Mosaic Website

Drugs

 

Anna Freud

Werneth School is working with Anna Freud, National Centre for Children and Families.

You can find expert resources and videos on the website.

Anna Freud Resources

Find a Health and Wellbeing service near you